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Americans call out companies trying to capitalize on Juneteenth

June 19 is a *** day of celebration and remembrance. Last year, President Joe Biden signed *** new legislation making June 19 a federal holiday. It joins other summer holidays, such as July 4 that retailers have used to market and sell goods and there are fears businesses are trying to capitalize on June 19, no one asked. Last month, North Carolina mom Darien Alexis MacNeill spotted *** juneteenth brand ice cream while shopping with her son at Walmart. She shared her disappointment on social media and the post went viral. They would never drop ice cream to celebrate Auschwitz, you know, the House of Liberation, we don’t have the same sensitivity when it comes to the holocaust, basically our own people. Have you explained all this to your 10 year old son? He asked me why I didn’t buy it and I told him it’s just not something I would accept or participate in Walmart, I took the ice cream off and apologized . What I don’t want Juneteenth to become is reduced. I’ve been relegated to, you know, just fucking mattress sales. Laquan Austin of the Juneteenth Foundation believes that instead of promoting products, companies can use the day to promote diversity and equity within their businesses. And he says the best way for American families to celebrate is to reflect on the importance of the holidays and to invest in communities of color and through black uses as a *** singular singular day to actually get out and support businesses and local black entrepreneurs in your community, supporting each other is *** really important, essential part of *** critical lesson McNeil says she teaches her son Elise Preston CBS news new york.

Americans call out companies trying to capitalize on Juneteenth

A North Carolina mother’s social media post has gone viral after she spotted Juneteenth-branded ice cream while shopping with her son at Walmart and shared her disappointment.

June 16 is Sunday, commemorating the day in 1865 when the last enslaved African Americans in Galveston, Texas were officially notified that the Civil War was over and they were free – two years after President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation. Last year, President Joe Biden signed a new law making June 19 a federal holiday. It joins other summer holidays like July 4, which retailers have used to market and sell products. And there are fears that companies are trying to capitalize on Juneteenth. Last month, North Carolina mom Darian Alexis McNeal spotted Juneteenth brand ice cream while shopping with her son at Walmart. She shared her disappointment on social media and the post went viral. “They would never drop ice cream to celebrate Auschwitz, you know, the liberation of Auschwitz. We don’t have the same sensitivity when it comes to the Holocaust, basically, our own people,” he said. said McNeal. Walmart removed the ice cream. and apologized. “What I don’t want Juneteenth to become is reduced and regulated to, you know, just a mattress day sale,” said Laquan Austion, founder of the Juneteenth Foundation. Austion believes that instead of pushing products, companies can use this day to promote diversity and equity within their company. And he says the best way for American families to celebrate is to reflect on the importance of the holiday and invest in communities of color. The fact that we support each other is a big part of that,” Austion says. Other titles:

June 16 is Sunday, commemorating the day in 1865 when the last enslaved African Americans in Galveston, Texas were officially notified that the Civil War was over and they were free – two years after President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation.

Last year, President Joe Biden signed a new law making June 19 a federal holiday. It joins other summer holidays like July 4, which retailers have used to market and sell products. And there are fears that companies are trying to capitalize on Juneteenth.

Last month, North Carolina mom Darian Alexis McNeal spotted Juneteenth-branded ice cream while shopping with her son at Walmart. She shared her disappointment on social media and the post went viral. “They would never drop ice cream to celebrate Auschwitz, you know, the liberation of Auschwitz. We don’t have the same sensibility when it comes to the Holocaust, basically, our own people,” McNeal said. .

Walmart removed the ice cream and apologized.

“What I don’t want Juneteenth to become is reduced and regulated to, you know, just a mattress day sale,” said Laquan Austion, founder of the Juneteenth Foundation.

Austion believes that instead of pushing products, companies can use the day to promote diversity and equity within their companies. And he says the best way for American families to celebrate is to reflect on the importance of the holiday and invest in communities of color.

“Go out and buy some black. Use it as a single day to get out there and support local black businesses in the community. That we support each other is a big part of that,” Austion says.

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